Hegesippus. Paris, 1524. Latin.

Hegesippi ... Historia de bello iudaico, scaeptri sublatione, Iudeorum dispersione, et Hierosolymitano excidio a diuo Ambrosio Mediolaneñ. Antistite e graeca latina facta. Cum eivsdem anacephaleosi, & tabellis cõgruẽtiarũ cũ Iosephi libris. Prȩmisso oim indice sub serie literaria. Hegesippi ... Historia de bello iudaico, scaeptri sublatione, Iudeorum dispersione, et Hierosolymitano excidio a diuo Ambrosio Mediolaneñ. Antistite e graeca latina facta. Cum eivsdem anacephaleosi, & tabellis cõgruẽtiarũ cũ Iosephi libris. Prȩmisso oim indice sub serie literaria. Hegesippi ... Historia de bello iudaico, scaeptri sublatione, Iudeorum dispersione, et Hierosolymitano excidio a diuo Ambrosio Mediolaneñ. Antistite e graeca latina facta. Cum eivsdem anacephaleosi, & tabellis cõgruẽtiarũ cũ Iosephi libris. Prȩmisso oim indice sub serie literaria. Hegesippi ... Historia de bello iudaico, scaeptri sublatione, Iudeorum dispersione, et Hierosolymitano excidio a diuo Ambrosio Mediolaneñ. Antistite e graeca latina facta. Cum eivsdem anacephaleosi, & tabellis cõgruẽtiarũ cũ Iosephi libris. Prȩmisso oim indice sub serie literaria.

Back fly leaf watermark.

While Flavius Josephus wrote his works in Greek, later, probably in the fourth century, they were translated into Latin, in which language they were mostly known throughout the Medieval period. However, towards the end of that same century, a Latin adaptation of Josephus' seven-book Jewish War, was published. This five-book Latin text but was not a translation of Josephus' work, but rather a "Christianized reworking, also incorporating material from the Antiquities and Christian hagiography" (Pollard 2015, 68). Initially this adaptation circulated under the name of Josephus, but eventually it came to be attributed to a certain Hegesippus, probably due to confusion with the early Christian historian by that name. Some have attributed this adaptation  to the Bishop Ambrose (second half of the 4th century), but that view is usually rejected, and the work's author/adaptor remains unknown. 

This edition of Hegesippus, or the De Excidio (as it is also known), was printed in 1524 in Paris. It is a reprint of the editio princeps from 1510 (Paris). Following the five-book De Excidio, a related work, the Anacephalaeosis, was printed in succession (leaf LXXXI). This is a summary ("recapitulation") of the text of the De Excidio, which was likewise erroneously attributed to Ambrose.

Finally, the last two pages of this edition contain a table listing the correspondences between Hegesippus and Josephus’ Jewish War (and Antiquities), composed by Michael Humelbergius, a German humanist (b. 1487 in Ravensburg, d. 1527). 

The paper for the back fly leaf of this volume contains a rather clear watermark of a bird atop three rocks. This watermark is not identified with certainty, as of yet.

Bibliographic Information

Title:

Hegesippi. Historiographi inter Christianos Antiquissimi & verissimi Historia. De bello Iudaico, Scaeptri sublatione, Iudeorum dispersione, et Hierosolymitano excidio...

Running title: Excidii Hierosolymitani 

Imprint:

[Parisiis] : Venundatur Iodoci Badio Ascensio, [1524].

Language:

Latin

Editor:

Jodocus Badius (1462-1535)

Physical description:

LXXXVI leaves ; 28 cm.

Contents:

Index -- II

Excidii Hierosolymitani  -- V

Anacephalaeosis [attributed to Ambrose] -- LXXXI

Sequuntur Tabulae Concordantiarum -- LXXXV

Signatures:

K8, L6

Copy notes:

Title within ornamental border; printer's device (3 men working on printing press).

Date on folio LXXXI: MDXXIIII.

Colophon:

... Anno salutis humanæ M. D. XXIIII. Ad idus novemb.

CRRS call number:

DS116 .H47 1524 

References

Linder, Amnon. (1992). “Ps. Ambrose's Anacephalaeosis: a Carolingian Treatise on the Destruction of Jerusalem.” Revue d'histoire des textes, bulletin no. 22, 145-158; online: https://www.persee.fr/doc/rht_0373-6075_1992_num_22_1992_1371

Pollard, Richard Matthew. (2015). "The De Excidio of 'Hegesippus' and the Reception of Josephus in the Early Middle Ages." Viator 46 (no. 2) 65-100. 

Hegesippus. Paris, 1524. Latin.